All You Need To Know About Giclee Prints

Whether you've moved into a new place and are trying to make it your own, or you're renovating your house, the thought of choosing a painting has occurred to all of us at some point along the way. The art we hang on our walls is a reflection of who we are. Hence, we choose these markers of our identity very carefully. The biggest roadblock in choosing art is usually its price. Who wouldn't want Mona Lisa to grace their walls or Van Gogh's Sunflowers blooming on them? But can you afford it?

The answer is yes! With advanced Giclee prints, reproducing artworks digitally makes them more affordable and accessible. Here's all you need to know about them:

What is a Giclee Print?

Advancements in print technology have made high quality reproductions of original 2D artworks a reality. One such innovation is the iconic Giclee Print. Giclee (pronounced “Zhee-clay”),  is a French term meaning “to spray”. It refers to inkjet printers that use small sprays to apply ink in precise quantities and replicates original artworks by matching the exact colours.

Giclee Prints: All You Need to Know About Giclee Prints - The Bimba Blog
The advent of Giclee printing in the late 1980s is considered a major milestone in the fine art community. If executed with precision, Giclee prints are the closest match to the original 2D artwork. The high quality of these prints give them a comparatively longer life span. 

Giclee printing can reproduce any type of 2D artwork, be it oil, acrylic or watercolor paintings. However, it is important to note that not all inkjet prints are Giclee prints. There are three basic criteria to determine whether an inkjet print can be considered a true Giclee:

1. Resolution of the original document

The advent of Giclee printing in the late 1980s is considered a major milestone in the fine art community. If executed with precision, Giclee prints are the closest match to the original 2D artwork. The high quality of these prints give them a comparatively longer life span.   Giclee printing can reproduce any type of 2D artwork, be it oil, acrylic or watercolor paintings. However, it is important to note that not all inkjet prints are Giclee prints. There are three basic criteria to determine whether an inkjet print can be considered a true Giclee:  Resolution of the original document

    For a good Giclee print, the original image should have a minimum resolution of 300 DPI (dots per inch). The reason for such high resolution requirements is that high number of colour dots in an area result in a more detailed image. Thus, the camera or scanner used to capture any piece of art, must do so at 300 DPI.

    2. Type of paper

    For a print to be a true Giclee, one must use a paper or substrate of archival quality. Archival paper refers to museum grade, cotton rag paper made from cotton pulp which is 100% acid free. Archival papers have greater longevity and support high quality colour reproduction. 

    3. Type of Ink and Printer

      Giclee Prints: All You Need to Know About Giclee Prints - The Bimba Blog

        A Giclee is printed by using pigment-based inks instead of dye-based inks found in lower-cost inkjet printers. Pigment-based inks are smudge-free, water-resistant, fade-proof and offer better colour stability. Owing to these qualities, this ink can last anywhere between 100 to 200 years without significant fading. Giclee prints are usually made with wide-format inkjet printers that can hold upto 12 cartridges and produce a wider colour spectrum. 

        If you dream of decorating your home or office with famous artworks without dipping into your savings, look no further than The Bimba! We have an in-house, advanced printer that produces Giclee prints that are as good as the original painting. When you order from us, you don't just get a printed canvas. We send you the complete package with a framed painting, all set to adorn your walls. Since Giclee prints have a higher quality and greater longevity, your favourite paintings will stay with you for years to come!

        - By Prakriti Bhat

        August 31, 2020 — Team Bimba